WaSP’s Work Is Done, But Mine (and Yours) Isn’t

Yesterday, on March 1, 2013, the Web Standards Project (aka WaSP) — a small, grass-roots group of web standards advocates assembled nearly 15 years ago — announced that it was formally wrapping up shop.

I was invited to join this small group of passionate and dedicated people almost nine years ago. My first email arrived on March 24, 2004 and, for the next few years, engaging with WaSP members and working on its projects were practically daily activities. Thinking I was a web standards “expert” when I started, I quickly learned that I had miles to go in terms of both technical knowledge and leadership growth. WaSP was a wonderful learning and growth experience for me.

Activity within the group slowed in more recent years, in part due to individuals moving on in their lives and not having as much time to dedicate to the mission, and in part due to the industry changing and naturally embracing what WaSP had advocated for so long: that implementing and following the specifications would make the web a better place for everyone. So, while the group exits the stage quietly, it’s not without having had a tremendous impact. And so, to my cohorts, I say congratulations on a job well done.

The final WaSP blog post closes by entrusting the ongoing WaSP mission to the reader. Don’t think you can change your team, your company, your country? WaSP’s legacy proves true the old adage: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” So go on, now — go change the world.

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